Skip to main content

SPC Reads 2018-19: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion: Art Project

The art project is sponsored by SPC Libraries and the Arts, Humanities, and Design Community.  Featuring SPC Tarpon campus students enrolled in Studio Art courses with Linda Berghoff, Phi Theta Kappa members, and Tarpon Gaming and Anime Club students.

The artwork is on display at the Tarpon Springs campus library (FA Building) (Monday, April 29th- Friday, May 17th) and is open to the public.

115 by Kat Deschamps

art piece by student Kat Deschamps

 

115 by Kat Deschamps

Goal or Message: It’s important to speak up about incidents such as the one with 115 and to shed light on the truth.

Inspiration:  The first inspiration is the scene in which Starr gave her eye witness statement at the police station.  Later she noticed Khalil was being labeled as a druggy instead of focusing on the fact that he was innocent when he was shot by officer number 115.

Choice of medium:  I strongly believe in having one’s voice when speaking about the truth be heard.

 

 

Finding Your Voice by Victoria Crosdale

art piece by student Victoria Crosdale

 

Finding Your Voice by Victoria Crosdale

Goal or Message:  Finding your voice is often difficult, but when you finally do, it can be something beautiful.

Inspiration:  When Starr stood on top of a car during the rally, and spoke to the crowd about Khalil.

Choice of medium:  Pastels are “flighty;” they often bleed and don’t let margins dictate where they leave their mark.  Markers are more stable, they leave solid and confined marks while marking where the other mediums should stop as well.

Voice by Alex Stewart

art piece by student Alex Stewart

 

Voice by Alex Stewart

Inspiration: This piece comes from the moment Starr, after years of promising to speak out, is in that wrong situation and can’t initially find her voice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The "Love" You Give! by Dr. JulieAnne Adamich-Scheblein

 

art piece by faculty Dr. JulieAnne Adamich-Scheblein

The "Love" You Give! by Dr. JulieAnne Adamich-Scheblein

Goal or Message: I visited the SPC/USF “Good Vibes Only Art & Music Festival” in Williams Park- St. Petersburg.  It is my hope that my composition inspires us to listen to music with positive lyrics/beats and to create art that instills loving emotions.

Inspiration:  On page 17 I read about the negative emotions that a song, “Daddy” that Khalil heard and played over and over again which instilled hate- referring to a “THUG-LIFE.” 

I found that by capturing a picture of the “art bus” with a mother/daughter in the foreground, it reminded me of the details in Chapter 3 where Starr’s parents’ love was expressed tohelp heal her emotions from witnessing first-hand Khalil’s tragic death.  This collage helped me to reflect on way that I can “give love” and instill positive emotions!

Choice of medium:  I find that photo journalism is a form of art that is realistic.  Enhancing the picture in the form of a multi-media collage encourages the creator-viewer of this medium of art to reflect in “depth” on an experience.

T.H.U.G. L.I.F.E. by Reyna Collazo

art piece by student Reyna Collazo

 

T.H.U.G. L.I.F.E. by Reyna Collazo

Goal or Message:  I want people to think about how our decisions affect others.  The cop was only thinking about himself, but maybe if he had thought about Khalil and Starr’s families, he may not have done what he did.

Inspiration:  I chose the scene right after Khalil is shot.  Even though she just witnessed her friend get murdered, she has no time to grieve because the cop who shot him points his gun at her.

Choice of medium:  I really like the way pastels blend and thought they would help produce interesting lighting.

See you later, alligator by Stephanie Kravets

art piece by student Stephanie Kravets

 

See you later, alligator by Stephanie Kravets

wolves inside U by Kristin Robinson

art piece by student Kristin Robinson  

 

wolves inside U by Kristin Robinson

Goal or Message: To point at the wolf in sheep’s clothing that affects everyone in society.  We process information by making shortcuts or connections in our brains.  We hear the word “red” and think “stop,” “apple,” “firetruck,” etc., but there are very dangerous stereotypes that are woven into the fabric of society that, at their core, make us feel separate or not responsible for all children and people in the world.

Inspiration:  In the beginning of the book, Starr flees the party in Garden Heights after a fight broke out and gunshots were fired.  She’s with Khalil and they begin to argue about how relevant Tupac is any more.  Khalil explains what the acronym “THUG LIFE” means.  I never knew what it stood for, but the meaning is deep.

Choice of medium:  The last art class I took was in 8th grade. I chose to define a term used in psychology, and then tried to draw a bunch of different symbols to capture the injustices surrounding race our legal system, poverty, and privilege. I used the back of an old water color painting, colored pens and pencils, and symbols because it’s what I had and it’s what I know.